Looking Foward to ‘The Glass Cage’ – Random Ambiguous Thoughts

On September 29, Nicholas Carr's book The Glass Cage - Automation and Us will be released. I have quoted Carr's writings often on this blog, and his essay All Can Be Lost: The Risk of Putting Our Knowledge in the Hands of Machines might anticipate some of the ideas he is going to explore in … Continue reading Looking Foward to ‘The Glass Cage’ – Random Ambiguous Thoughts

I Picked the Right Blogging Platform! (Book Review: The Year without Pants)

Before starting this blog I compared blogging tools in 2011. These two facts about WordPress and Automattic did win me over: Every new employee has to do three weeks of end-user support, regardless of position. They have a developer who calls himself the Quantum Bug Creator and has a PhD in Quantum Cryptography. Now I … Continue reading I Picked the Right Blogging Platform! (Book Review: The Year without Pants)

Career Advice – Borrowing Wise Words from a Sailing Hacker

On researching SSL-related hacks, I have stumbled upon the website of notable security researcher Moxie Marlinspike. Marlinspike is also a sailor and working on diverse projects, such as Audio Anarchy - a project for transcribing anarchist books into audio format. On his About page he says: I like computer security and software development, particularly in the … Continue reading Career Advice – Borrowing Wise Words from a Sailing Hacker

I Want to Be Antifragile and Have Skin in the Game

Having read The Black Swan and Antifragile by Nassim Taleb I might have become an orthodox member of the Taleb Cult. The more Taleb's ideas struck a chord with me intuitively, the more I try to scrutinize them. I jumped to the 1-star reviews amazon.com to challenge my gullibility, and I tried my best to … Continue reading I Want to Be Antifragile and Have Skin in the Game

More Capitalism, Less Zen. Tackling Existential Questions Once More. In Vain?

Usually you make things worse by trying to explain again what you didn't get across the first time. I do it nonetheless. My post on Zen Capitalism might have been interpreted as advocating Follow Your Bliss and Anything Else Will Follow (Money, in particular). I cringe; this is exactly what I intended to avoid, but … Continue reading More Capitalism, Less Zen. Tackling Existential Questions Once More. In Vain?

So-Called Zen Capitalism and Random Thoughts on Entrepreneurship

In this blog and in the comments' section of other blogs I have repeatedly ridiculed: management consultants, new age-y self help literature and simple-minded soft skills trainers. Let alone all other life-forms in the lower left quadrant of the verbal skills vs. quant skills diagram. Now it is time that I give you a chance … Continue reading So-Called Zen Capitalism and Random Thoughts on Entrepreneurship

On Social Media and Networking (Should Have Been a Serious Post, Turned out Otherwise)

It has been nearly a month since my satirical post on LinkedIn and bot-like HR professionals has stirred interesting discussions and unexpected reblogs. I have promised to come up with related posts regularly. To all my new followers who were probably attracted by the Liebster-award-related nonsense: Compared to those posts this one is unfortunately a … Continue reading On Social Media and Networking (Should Have Been a Serious Post, Turned out Otherwise)

Professional Online Persona or: What Are Your Skills?

My previous post has triggered intriguing discussions - about writing, identity and what I called an 'online persona'. As far as I remember I borrowed this term from David Weinberger's book Small Pieces Loosely Joined - sublime reflections on the way the web has impacted culture and communication. I have asked myself sometimes: How should … Continue reading Professional Online Persona or: What Are Your Skills?

Philosophy Degrees are Undervalued

This is a vain and self-servicing reblog. I really like the figures in this post (as a physicist). Edit (2017): It seems that unfortunately the original, reblogged post is not available any more. It featured a diagram that visualized the results of GRE tests: Verbal and quantitative skills of graduates - as discussed also e.g. … Continue reading Philosophy Degrees are Undervalued

Work Hard – Play Hard

There is indeed a 'corporate culture' named like this. Trusting Wikipedia on this: In their 1984  [sic!] book, Corporate Cultures, Deal and Kennedy identified a particular corporate culture which they called the 'work hard/play hard culture': "Fun and action are the rule here, and employees take few risks, all with quick feedback; to succeed, the … Continue reading Work Hard – Play Hard