Infinite Loop: Theory and Practice Revisited.

I've unlocked a new achievement as a blogger, or a new milestone as a life-form. As a dinosaur telling the same old stories over and over again. I started drafting a blog post, as I always do since a while: I do it in my mind only, twist and turn in for days or weeks … Continue reading Infinite Loop: Theory and Practice Revisited.

On Learning

Some years ago I was busy with projects that required a lot of travelling but I also needed to stay up-to-date with latest product features and technologies. When a new operating system was released a colleague asked how I could do that - without having time for attending trainings. Without giving that too much thought, and having my … Continue reading On Learning

How to Introduce Special Relativity (Historical Detour)

I am just reading the volume titled Waves in my favorite series of ancient textbooks on Theoretical Physics by German physics professor Wilhelm Macke. I tried to resist the urge to write about seemingly random fields of physics, and probably weird ways of presenting them - but I can't resist any longer. There are different … Continue reading How to Introduce Special Relativity (Historical Detour)

In Praise of Textbooks with Tons of Formulas (or: The Joy of Firefighting)

I know. I am repeating myself. Maurice Barry has not only recommended Kahneman's Thinking, Fast and Slow to me, but he also runs an interesting series of posts on his eLearning blog. These got mixed and entangled in my mind, and I cannot help but returning to that pet topic of mine. First, some statistically … Continue reading In Praise of Textbooks with Tons of Formulas (or: The Joy of Firefighting)

“Student Friendly Quantum Field Theory”

As other authors of science blogs have pointed out: Most popular search terms are submitted by students. So I guess it is not the general public who is interested in: the theory of gyroscopes, (theory of) microwaves, (theory of) heat pumps, (theory of) falling slinkies, or the Coriolis force. I believe that these search terms … Continue reading “Student Friendly Quantum Field Theory”

May the Force Field Be with You: Primer on Quantum Mechanics and Why We Need Quantum Field Theory

As Feynman explains so eloquently - and yet in a refreshingly down-to-earth way - understanding and learning physics works like this: There are no true axioms, you can start from anywhere. Your physics knowledge is like a messy landscape, built from different interconnected islands of insights. You will not memorize them all, but you need … Continue reading May the Force Field Be with You: Primer on Quantum Mechanics and Why We Need Quantum Field Theory

On Science Communication

In a parallel universe I might work as a science communicator. Having completed my PhD in applied physics I wrote a bunch of job applications, one of them being a bit eccentric: I applied at the Austrian national public service broadcaster. (According to Wikipedia Austria was the last country in continental Europe after Albania to … Continue reading On Science Communication

And Now for Something Completely Different: Quantum Fields!

Do I miss assignments and exams? Definitely not, and I am now - finally, really, absolutely - determined to complete another program I had set for myself about 2-3 years ago. I had not been able to pull it off in addition to being a moonlighting student. Since about 10 years I have been recycling my physics knowledge on … Continue reading And Now for Something Completely Different: Quantum Fields!

Stargate: Succumb to the Power of the Ritual

Thanks for your prayers, voodoo magic, encouraging tweets or other tweaking the fabric of our multiverse: Yesterday I have passed my final exams and defence - I did very well, and I am a Master of Science in Sustainable Energy Systems now. As the sensationalist title indicates I tried to play it cool but finally … Continue reading Stargate: Succumb to the Power of the Ritual

Creepy Game of Life

Every undergraduate in a science degree program has to develop some variant of Game of Life - in a programming 101 course. These - not very intelligent - life-forms on a checkerboard evolve by following very simple rules - 'cell' live or die, depending on its number of neighbors. The pattern is determined by the … Continue reading Creepy Game of Life