Shortest Post Ever

… self-indulgent though, but just to add an update on the previous post.

My new personal website is  live:

elkement.subversiv.at

I have already redirected the root URLs of the precursor sites radices.net, subversiv.at and e-stangl.at. Now I am waiting for Google’s final verdict; then I am going to add the rewrite map for the 1:n map of old ASP files and new ‘posts’. This is also the pre-requisite for informing Google about the move officially.

The blog-like structure and standardized attributes like Open Graph meta tags and a XML sitemap should make my site more Google-likeable. With the new site – and one dedicated host name only – I finally added permanent redirects (HTTP 301). Before I used temporary (HTTP 302) redirects, to send requests from the root directory to subfolders, which (so the experts say) is not search-engine-friendly.

On the other hand the .at domain will not help: You can pick a certain country as preferred audience for a non-country domain, but I have to stick with Austria here, even if the language is set to English in all the proper places (I hope).

I have discovered that every WordPress.com Tag or Category has its own feed – just add /feed/ to the respective URLs – and I will make use this in order to automate some of my link curation, like this. This list of physics postings has been created from this feed of selected postings:
https://elkement.wordpress.com/category/science-and-technology/physics/feed/
Of course this means re-tagging and re-categorizing here! Thanks WordPress for the Tags to Categories (and vice versa) Conversion Tools!

It is fun to watch my server’s log files more closely. Otherwise I would have missed that SQL injection attack attempt, trying to put spammy links on my website (into my database):

SQL injection by spammer-hackers

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Shortest Post Ever

    • The attack was not successful – this is just the entry in the log file showing the attempt to access my database, not yet a part of a website or database. All these lines of code are one long URL – the ‘hacky’ part is appended to a valid URL (not visible, black) as a querystring (after a question mark). It depends on the software handling such Urls (or equally weird entries in form fields) if the attack is successful. ‘Normally’ / ‘theoretically’ such attacks should not work as input code should be validated and anonymous users should not have permissions to update records in the database…. but there might be vulnerabilities in the server software or ‘forgotten’ standard passwords.

          • Wow. We are considering dumping our phone service because of the huge volume of solicitation calls we get every week. Our provider also maintains a website where all complaints are registered and investigation outcomes noted for phone numbers that repeatedly call through or get past blocking legislation or technology. Most of these are found to be local numbers hacked and “hijacked” by someone else for no good purposes. This sort of thing has serious impact on legitimate business while becoming highly intrusive in our private lives. I can’t imagine what it would take to reduce the imposition on line, through email, fax and phone connections. No one seems to be able to figure it out… Could be a wealthy business if someone does.

            • I have noticed more of those annoying calls, too! Typically call centers, located in another country, with staff speaking German with a thick accent.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s